Welcome to

South Park Pottery

I am Sally Smith and I run South Park Pottery in the Yorkshire Dales.


I have been a potter for most of my life and I make a wide range of domestic and giftware using an electric kiln. When you look at my Gallery you will see the range of things I make.

Whilst in times gone by I have potted for a living I am now retired and only make the pots which give me pleasure and allow me to indulge in getting the most out of my glazes by constantly experimenting.

I love making slab pots. Rolling out the clay and using it almost as a canvas. I apply my red, white and black slips and occasionally a bit of blue by brushing, dipping and trailing. I find this very exciting and decorate with abandon using almost anything I can lay my hands on to get an effect.

At a time when I was unable to pot, I drew plants; building up rich texture using oil pastels and then scratching through with a pencil. I enjoyed the resist this created with watercolours. I can remember feeling a sense of frustration because I never seemed to achieve an end product. That disappeared when I started potting again as the images have been a unique decorative resource. It seems you can’t take the potter out of the artist!

Slab Pot
Pottery Art
Pottery Art
Pottery Art
Vase Crockery

A book, handed to me on a family visit - 'this might be of interest to you' – has proved to be a huge inspiration. The book, an American publication , is about the life and work of C.F.Binns who started work in the sales office of the Royal Worcester porcelain factory in the mid 1800s ( his father was co managing director there) but emigrated to America in the late C19th. He was well respected as a writer and lecturer in ceramic art and in fact opened the first ceramics course at Alfred University in New York. It is said that Binns took clay work from the factory to the studio and was certainly a pioneer in combining science with art. I have used a simple recipe- reputedly one that Binns used- and added a range of oxides and the odd extra something to increase the reaction. The results from these tests were promising. Applied thickly, dipped and sprayed, they show a rich, buttery texture and gradation of colour. This lead to memory-slip back to college days and projects exploring Chinese glazes plus more and more images of early Chinese ware appearing in my husband’s antiques magazine help fuel this aspect of my work.

Long may it all continue!

I use stoneware clay – fired to 1260 degrees in my electric kiln – and simple slips to decorate both thrown and hand-built pots.
Wood ash glazes are a staple; there is something immensely satisfying about using materials readily at hand.
I draw the line at digging my own clay though I have used local clay in the odd glaze or slip.
The ash is from our wood-burning stove or from members of the family who happen to be using a nice bit of wood on their fire!
I make crude brushes using twigs or stems from the garden dragging through wet slip applied to leather hard pots while they are on the wheel (hakeme).
This gives a depth and texture to the pot after glazing.
Glazing

Portfolio


Here are some examples of my work.

Artwork
An example of red artwork
Artwork
Artwork
Small dish
Artwork
Teapot
Artwork
Jug and saucer
Artwork
10" bowl slip trailed iron glaze pattern
Artwork
12inch shallow bowl and small vase in cobalt blue glaze
Artwork
Cobalt glaze, tea bowl and saucer and small vase.
Artwork
Artwork
Large ochre wood ash glazed bowl, fired to 1260 degrees. touches of turquoise and blue.
Artwork
Artwork
Artwork
3 dishes
Artwork
Artwork
Artwork
Artwork
Artwork
Artwork
Artwork
Artwork
Cobalt blue glaze, dual purpose group, oblong dish with 3 'daisy'pots.
Artwork
Cobalt glaze with copper glaze over

Contact Me


The pottery is not open to the public other than during my periodic open weekends but I am always happy to see visitors by prior appointment.
The pottery is located 6 miles from Ripon in North Yorkshire.